Stand up for what you believe in, even if it goes against the current status quo.

What do y’all think?

Can you truly separate your politics from your religion?

This is a question I have been thinking a lot about recently, and I thought it would be an interesting discussion point.

We hear a lot about the separation between church and state. In our secular society, the political sphere is not meant for any sort of religion or religious argument, and opponents to religion don’t let the rest of us forget it.

But isn’t religion a lifestyle? Shouldn’t it be such a large part of us that we can’t separate it from our private and our public lives?

Rick Santorum has gotten some heat for bringing his religious morals and values into the political spectrum, especially on the issue of gay “marriage.” His critics don’t want to hear any mention of God or the bible or anything to do with Catholic faith.

But what about those politicians and leaders who say they have religion, but don’t show any indication of practicing it?

I do not think religion and politics should be separated, nor do I think they really CAN be separate if an individual has a strong faith and conviction in their respective religion.

I am a college student who has a strong Catholic faith. I am the same person in public as I am in private. I have the same morals and values when I am with one close friend and when I am with a large group of my peers. I don’t just attend church on Sunday, sing the hymns and praise Jesus, but then disregard my faith the other six days of the week.

My faith is who I am. It influences every aspect of my life. My decisions, my political views, my outlook on life. It influences how I treat people, how I live every minute of every day. It influences the politicians I support and vote for in elections. It influences what I want from my government, and what I don’t want.

What kind of hypocrite would I be if on Sunday I praised a God who opposed abortion, but then on Tuesday advocated for a Pro-Choice standpoint on abortion? Would you be able to look me in the eye if I told you, “I’m a religious person, but I know that other people aren’t, so I’m not going to force them to respect all human life the way God expects us to. They’re going to abort their babies anyways, we might as well make it legal and available to women who want it.” (Some girl actually said this in one of my political science classes. Not even joking.)

The truth of the matter is, if religion is an integral part of someone’s life, if it influenced their decisions and provided the purpose of their existence, they would have an incredibly difficult time separate their religious beliefs from politics. In fact, it would be impossible.

The Founding Fathers, while they did want separation between government and a religion institution, believed that religion was and should be a part of people’s everyday lives. They acknowledged that it could make a person BETTER.

I’d like you hear you viewpoints! Comment comment comment!

~Lucy

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Comments on: "Keep Politics and Religion Together" (2)

  1. Fanaticism starts when one imposes their personal moral and religious beliefs on others. There are quotes from various founding fathers expressing religion as a personal relationship with God in which the state can not interfere.

    In order to respect the principle of religious freedom one must respect the freedom of all religions even if they hold diametrically opposed beliefs when compared side by side.
    You are not to stand in judgement of anyone else even when their views seem unholy or immoral. That is the purvey of the final Judge.

    • I agree with you. The state should not be involve on matters concerning religion. But the Founding Fathers did acknowledge it as an important and beneficial institution in society.
      God is the ultimate judge. Amen. 🙂

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